Hunter Valley Australian Travel Map

Full Interactive Hunter Valley Australian Travel Map

The Hunter Valley was one of Australia’s earliest settled wine areas. On the Hunter Valley Australian Travel Map, find Newcastle in the lower right hand corner and follow the Pacific Highway (124, 111) inland until it becomes the A15. The Hunter Valley runs inland from Beresford and is centered in the area between Maitland, Raymond Terrace and Brandy Hill on the Hunter Valley Australian Travel Map.

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Hunter Valley Australian Travel Map

Zoom in on the area between Maitland and Raymond Terrace on the Hunter Valley Australian Travel Map. You will see the Hunter river winding through the area. As you zoom in further you will see the individual plots of the vineyards.

PanoramaHunter Valley Australian Travel Map

Wineries of The Hunter Valley

This region is home to over fifty wineries, the most famous of which are Lindemans, McWilliams, Tyrrell’s, Rothbury, Tullock, Wyndham Estate, Rosemount and Mountarrow.

Traditionally, the Hunter Valley depended on Semillon and Shiraz (known locally as Hermitage), though in recent years Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon have also become important varieties. Though this is predominantly a white wine producing area, the reds are also excellent. With age, most wines of the Hunter have a certain softness, the whites being honeyed and the reds velvety…reflecting, perhaps, the very warm climate of the valley.

Many wineries are open for cellar door sales and wine tasting and it is possible to spend an extremely pleasant day or so exploring the area.  If you only have a day to devote to the Hunter Valley, a small group tour is a good way to experience things first hand. 

Vines Hunter Valley Australian Travel Map

Will Travel Planning Help? > Australian Travel Planner

Compare Prices on Hotels in Hunter Valley: > Australian.com – Hotels in Hunter Valley

Day Tour: > Small-Group Hunter Valley Wine and Cheese Tasting Tour from Sydney

More Information on Hunter Valley:  > Hunter Region | Wikipedia